What Grows on Your Balcony? Update 02/05/2014

Yeah! And forget balconies too!  Use them to grow!

We are big proponents of growing food, not lawns.  But we take it one step further!  Balconies could be the only lawn most people have for a large portion of their lives.  City living crams more and more people into tiny spaces leaving less and less outside space for each of us.  Why not use the tiny spaces to grow flowers, herbs, or even some small vegetables.  Sure, the crop won’t be huge but the gain will be incredible!

Sprouting 

Blackberries, Raspberries, Grapes and Grapes

Basil, Basil, Basil

Aji dulces and sabrocitos sprouting

Oregano, Basil, Mint, Dragon Fruit

Ducli berries facing the cold

Basil reviving after a rather vicious pesto pruning

Balcony Garlic sprouting

Rosemary spring sprouting roots





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What Grows on Your Balcony? Update 01/25/2014

We have left our Zone 10b home behind to venture off and relocate to Zone 9b adding a myriad of new growing options to our already long wish list.  We are in the process of find a long term home where we can plant in the ground but for now we will go back to balcony gardening as a means to release our primal gardening urges.

Garlic shooting up from our balcony garden
Lemongrass relocated from Miami
Dulci Berry, Magic fruit, seedling
Mint in a tiny pot
Aji Dulce, Aji cachuca sproted in a gallon milk jug




This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see our disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting The Tattooed Homestead.

What Grows on Your Balcony? Update 01/25/2014

We have left our Zone 10b home behind to venture off and relocate to Zone 9b adding a myriad of new growing options to our already long wish list.  We are in the process of find a long term home where we can plant in the ground but for now we will go back to balcony gardening as a means to release our primal gardening urges.

Garlic shooting up from our balcony garden
Lemongrass relocated from Miami
Dulci Berry, Magic fruit, seedling

Mint in a tiny pot

Aji Dulce, Aji cachuca sproted in a gallon milk jug





This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see our disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting The Tattooed Homestead.

I am The Tattooed Homestead

I have an overdeveloped sense of fairness!
I have no idea where I got it.  
I believe that the Truth will always win over a lie, that the little guy will always beat the big mean corporation, and that when the story ends everything will be as it should be.

But sometimes, things bring darkness into my rose colored world.

So this is how it begins …

In the last month, we have been given three warnings by Miami-Dade Code Enforcement for a laundry list of issues like having cardboard boxes, tarps, tools, and “other junk and trash scattered around” the property.

Courtesy of Dade County Planning and Zoning
This is not The Tattooed Homestead
When we called, they informed us it was illegal to have potted plants and potting soil in a residential property.

I shared our story ( Potted Plants are Illegal: Why YOU Can’t Grow Your Own Food In Miami-Dade County ) and it got picked up by the New Times ( Potted Garden in Your Yard? Prepare to Pay a Fine! )

Someone pointed out:

But wait. You guys do run a business out of your home selling plants and plant products. At least that’s what it seems like to me all over social media. I don’t see how anyone could think you arw being picked on when this is clear.

The truth is that we don’t.

Are we a nursery? Not by any means.

We sell to friends and family and other liked minded souls who believe in growing your own food but may not have the resources or the time.

But this is not The Tattooed Homestead.

We’ve been staying here for just over two months, helping out with an ailing Grandmother and planting every edible we can get our hands on.  My mom planned to sell this family home to us one day and let us start the permaculture process now.  But as chance would have it, those plans will more than likely never come to fruition.  

This is not The Tattooed Homestead

Our business is run out of a family home in Flagami.

This is not The Tattooed Homestead either.  Not really, anyway.

This is my husband’s childhood home, where his family has allowed us to take over the yard and grow odds and ends here and there.

So then where the heck is it?

The Tattooed Homestead is real.  At least, it is to me and my husband, and I hope it one day will be to our baby boy.

The Tattooed Homestead is:

… the idea of living sustainably and not hurting the planet while you’re doing it.  It is the idea of leaving the earth a better place than when you got here.  It is the idea that I want my child to know how food grows in the garden and not think that it comes from McDonalds.  It is that I want my child to believe that the Truth will always win over a lie, that the little guy will always beat the big mean corporation, and that when the story ends everything will be as it should be.  


… and if he falls victim to having an overdeveloped sense of fairness … then I will know I definitely did something right!

I know I’m not like everybody else.

I think that’s ok.

Right now, The Tattooed Homestead only exists in my mind … and on the internet.  One day, it may be a real place.  It may be here or somewhere far away.  It won’t make much of a difference either way to be honest.

Some things will never change:

We will always grow using sustainable practices and ideas.  We will never use pesticides or treatments for our plants or for our bees.  We will always think with our hearts instead of our pocket books and we will always follow our hearts and let it guide us to what is right.  

Some people may think I’m crazy.

I think that’s ok, too.

It’s not the first time I have been called different or crazy and I truly hope it won’t be the last.

As for my overdeveloped sense of fairness, I may need to learn to live with the fact that I may never change the world … but no one said I couldn’t try!





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Frugal Fridays — Free Kindle Books, Learning Styles and a Cute Little Piggy


Happy Friday!


We have made it through another week of fun here at the homestead.  

Want to read our adventures straight from your inbox? 

Don’t forget to enter your email in the Subscribe for Free Updates box and click Subscribe to stay up to date with our wacky adventures!

What Type of Learner Are You? 

What Type of Learner Are You?
source: ( OnlineCollege.org )

Free Kindle Books
These ebooks are only free for a limited time so if you are interested in one make sure you get it right away so you don’t lose out!

Remember you DON”T need a kindle to take advantage of these! There are FREE kindle apps for most major platforms!! iPhone, iPad, PC, Mac and Android. You can find those apps here Free Kindle Books Limited Time Offers!


REMEMBER TO ALWAYS CHECK PRICES BEFORE PURCHASING
To make sure it has not returned to full price.


Oh, and Last but not least …

So Cute 😉





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Article: Contaminated Soil Found At Coconut Grove’s Blanche Park


Contaminated soil was found in Coconut Grove’s Blanche Park. 

 The soil samples contained “concentrations of dioxins, arsenic, barium, lead, copper and antimony’’ that exceeded levels allowed by county code.

Read more here: http://www.miamiherald.com/2013/09/09/3616055/contaminated-soil-found-in-blanche.html





This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see our disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting The Tattooed Homestead.

How to Hold a Successful Yard Sale in South Florida: The Saturday Vs Sunday Debate

1. Check the Rules
Miami-Dade County does not require a permit. “Citizens are allowed to hold 2 Garage Sales per year; anything over that is not permitted. Signs are not permitted on the right-of-way to announce or advertise the garage sale.” (source: http://www.miamidade.gov/building/standards/residential-garage-sales.asp ) Be conscious of where you are placing signs and make sure they are clear and legible.  You don’t want to slow or stall traffic due to poor signage, or worse … you might lose a potential customer because they couldn’t decipher your sign.  
2. Consider the Date
According to my research, (i.e. extensive Googling) there tends to be a consensus that Saturday is the BEST day to hold a yard sale.  I was also surprised to learn Fridays are a good day too, although I am hesitant to agree off the bat, taking into consideration South Florida’s inherent nature to be so different than anywhere else.

3. Check the Weather
In South Florida, the weather can change from Sunny and Hot, to Wet and Hot, to Torrential Downpour and Hot at the drop of a hat.  Monitor the weather in the days nearing your sale and watch for any Storm Warnings.  Bad weather will mean a low turn out and possible damage to the items you are trying to sell.

4. Involve your Neighbors
See if your neighbors have anything they would like to sell, most of them might or might not take you up on it but at least you let them know and tried include them.  This should reduce the possibility of dirty looks when you are setting up your yard sale the morning off.

5. Price your Items
Clear pricing of your items will save you headaches.  Avoid placing prices on the bottom and you won’t get people asking 10 times for the price of an item.  Also, it gives you time to research and let go of the item at a fair price you are comfortable with.

6. Be Organized
Don’t set out a box of books and expect people to sort through them or a box of clothes and hope people will figure it out.  Hang clothes, and don’t forget to go through the pockets to make sure nothing is left in them, it will be much neater and no one will run off with your pocket change or other items in your pocket.

7. Advertise
Running an ad in the Newspaper is old school but still appropriate for yard sales.  But don’t forget our friend Craig’s list.  Start Advertising at least a few days in advance.

8. Remember to have Change
Murphy’s Law dictates everyone will come with large bills to pay for your .50 cent items, have change to spare.  Don’t let a sale get away from you for lack of change.

9. Have Bags will Travel
Save up grocery bags to have for your customers to take their items home with.  If you don’t have any, everyone will ask.  Murphy’s Law strikes again.

10. Have a Back up plan
Know what you will do with the items you don’t sell.  Hauling stuff you didn’t want anymore back inside your house stinks.  Arrangements for a Good Will pick up or Haul away will making getting rid of the items a lot easier.  





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How to Make Crock Pot Honey Balsamic Pork Lion

I was recently introduced to cooking in a Crock Pot.  It is by far the easiest way to make a home cooked meal.  I quickly went from 1 Crock Pot to 3.  A small one, One just for Soaps and a Large one for Family Style meals when company comes over or to make enough for left overs for several days.  Another bonus is that you are not turning on the Oven and heating up your home, a BIG BONUS in South Florida in the summer months.  
I especially like to use it on weekends when I can set up dinner and go about our busy day and have dinner ready at the end of the day.   

3 to 3 1/2 lbs pork tenderloin
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon white pepper
3/4 cup Balsamic Vinegar
1/4 cup Olive Oil
1/3 cup Raw Local honey
2 Tablespoon Dijon mustard
1 Tablespoon dried Thyme, but I replaced it with Rosemary as I prefer the taste
9 cloves of Garlic (crushed)
10 – 15 Baby Yukon Gold Potatoes
2 onions (sliced)

Directions:
1 Sprinkle pork tenderloin with salt and pepper; place in slow cooker fat side down.

2 In a small bowl, combine remaining ingredients; pour over pork tenderloin.  Remember to turn pork to coat all sides.

3 Cover and cook on LOW 7 to 8 hours or HIGH 3 1/2 to 4 hours.





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Article: Gardener’s To Do List for Zone 10



Here in Zone 10 we are offered quite unique Gardening experience.  Zone 10 covers almost of our what is considered South Florida exclusively.  There are things we can grow that are Northern sister zones can not grow and things they can grow that we can’t.  That is why it is import to be specific when researching in our Zone. 





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How To Dehydrate Oregano

Dehydrating Oregano is a great experience for any aspiring chef.  Harvesting is easy, it smells amazing and has a myriad of uses.  Plus there is nothing better than following a recipe and being able to pull out ingredients you grew yourself.    

Oregano after it’s hair cut

How To Dehydrate (Greek) Oregano

Cut the branches an inch or so from the base.  I like to leave a little so it will grow back quickly, kind of like cutting a few inches of hair to get new growth in faster, it might be a Wive’s Tale but it’s the way that works for me.

Rinse leaves and remove any that may be off color or branches that have gone to seed.

Place your trays on the dehydrator and arrange leaves loosely and evenly. Do not allow the leaves to clump together because it will take forever to get them dehydrated and they won’t dehydrate evenly. 
Set your dehydrator to 95 degrees, or the setting used for herbs and dehydrate for about 4-6 hours.  It may take a bit longer depending on how thick you spread the leaves. 
Store in an air-tight container, I prefer Ball Dry Herb Jars, or a Ziploc bag works well too.  
Are you looking to get started dehydrating?

I highly recommend this dehydrator.  It’s affordable and easy to use.  It’s the one we have here on the homestead 😉

~ The Tattooed Beekeeper’s Wife





This post may contain affiliate links. These affiliate links help support this site. For more information, please see our disclosure policy. Thank you for supporting The Tattooed Homestead.